Becoming a Shaman

I've been teasing you with tales of transition for months now. So finally, here it is: my next big step in life - I'm becoming a shaman.

Becoming a Shaman Becoming a Shaman

Financially Sustainable Travel: My 2014 Income

Every year, I publish my annual cost of full-time travel as well as my income. Here's my 2014 income, where it came from, and what's on tap for 2015.

Financially Sustainable Travel: My 2014 Income Financially Sustainable Travel: My 2014 Income

Financially Sustainable Travel: My Cost of Full-Time Travel in 2014

What does it cost to travel full-time? That answer varies, as it has for me over the years. Here's my cost of full-time travel in 2014.

Financially Sustainable Travel: My Cost of Full-Time Travel in 2014 Financially Sustainable Travel: My Cost of Full-Time Travel in 2014

Becoming a Shaman

by Nora Dunn on May 21, 2015

“I see this being a hit tv show: Becoming a Shaman,” wrote a friend of mine who works in the television business.

Although I doubt it will ever become a tv show, it is what I’m doing. (Sort of).

 

Since publishing my musings on san pedro and ayahuasca after two months of working with these plant medicines last year, so much has happened. Firstly, I decided to establish a home base in Peru; a lovely place to live peacefully and explore to my heart’s content.

When I returned to Peru and to my new home base last September after a few months of travel, I continued to work with these plant medicines. If the list of accomplishments I outlined in my first post seemed like 10 years of psychotherapy, the next two months held another 50 years of psychotherapy.

I also started assisting my teacher with ceremonies. This happened serendipitously; after my very first ceremony with san pedro six months prior, I had a strong night of dreams about a number of things that came true. The only thing that hadn’t come true from those dreams was that I would be assisting in ceremonies; and there I was, six months later, assisting.

 

Time for a Change

I’d known for at least a year that my life was (is) ready for another transition. After over eight years of wandering the world, I started to regard world maps with a degree of apathy, responding to the imploring gaze of the map’s as-yet undiscovered gems with “Meh. Sure, there are lots of places I haven’t seen. But they’re all kind of the same anyway.”

Now of course that isn’t true, but it was reflective of my decreased desire to “conquer the world” by seeing and doing everything. I don’t compare my country-count with others, nor am I interested in racing from one destination to another. I’ve long been a proponent of slow travel, and now it seems it’s getting even slower. (It’s not stopping, mind you; I traveled for two months to three countries just earlier this year, and I’m about to hit the jungles of Peru for a month, followed by a few weeks in the U.S.).

But I had no idea what I was transitioning to. I knew I liked Peru, and I knew it was time to slow down, but that was all.

And so I toiled. Amidst the beauty and serenity of Peru’s Andes, I wrought my stomach in knots. “I’m doing what people dream of! Traveling the world full-time and making a living with an internet connection. How can I be tired of it?” I said to myself. It seemed almost disrespectful to no longer appreciate this dream lifestyle.

But I was tired of it. I needed a new form of stimulation, and to engage the world in a different way.

 

Assisting a Shaman

Even after I started assisting my friend and teacher with his ceremonies, I couldn’t envision becoming a shaman. “It’s not like I’ll ever be leading ceremonies myself,” I said to friends, who looked quizzically at me when I told them I was assisting.

“Why not?” was their honest reply, to which I never really had an answer.

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A Week-In-The-Life of Ben and Marissa in Italy

by Nora Dunn on May 18, 2015

BenandMarissaBen and Marissa left their jobs in January 2014 to do some long-term travel in Europe and test their 12-year relationship by spending all their time together 24/7 for four months. 2014 saw them visit Ireland, Scotland, England, the Czech Republic, Italy, France, Spain, and Portugal. Please enjoy this week-in-the-life of these adventurers, in Italy.

 

Day 1

Today we’re leaving Minori, the fishing village on the Amalfi Coast where we’ve spent the last 10 days. It rained for eight of those, so we’re happy to at least have a little bit of sunshine for the beautiful (but terrifying) bus ride along the cliffs and out of town. We go to an ATM (bankomat in Italy) and it won’t let me take out cash on my debit card. Hmm, this same machine worked a week ago. I take out a cash advance on my credit card, and the first conclusion I draw is that my debit card has been de-magnetized. This should make for an interesting few days, considering almost everything we have done in Italy so far has been cash only. (See also: 11 Tricks to Using ATMs Abroad)

8:00 am We wander over to the bus stop. There’s only one road through town, and lucky for us the stop is right across the street from the apartment we’ve been staying in. Our bus is late, which makes me nervous – I don’t want to miss our train into Florence.

9:00 am Bus arrives and we get on after stashing our luggage below; it’s getting to tourist season now and it’s standing room only. We guard our pockets and backpacks, as the last time we took this bus, Ben was pick-pocketed and we lost his ID, along with debit and credit cards. He only had €15 cash and the passports luckily were elsewhere, so nothing serious came of the theft. But it was still a hassle and made us feel pretty vulnerable.

(Editor’s note: I understand! I had my purse stolen in Cusco, and it was no fun).

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I Did It! 6 Little Victories of Travel

by Nora Dunn on May 11, 2015

Even with over eight years of full-time travel under my belt (and prior to that a veritably plush repertoire of travel experiences), I still feel a surge of excitement at what seem like trivial accomplishments on the road. These are the little victories of travel.

(See also: The Number 1 Reason Why I Love Slow Travel)

 

Solo Travel

I don’t think I’m the only one who gets a rush of excitement in traveling solo – especially in the beginning. A girlfriend who visited me abroad remarked on what a rush it was to fly by herself (she’s used to herding other people when traveling, but doing it solo felt different).

Solo travel is home to some of the most confidence-boosting travel victories. “I did it!” you exclaim while doing an inner happy dance at having traveled from A to B on your own.

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A Week-In-The-Life of Chris Reynolds – The One Effect, in Peru

05 | 04 Peru

Here’s a week-in-the-life of Chris Reynolds and a group of volunteers as part of The One Effect, expanding sustainable farming in the Sacred Valley of Peru.

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Financially Sustainable Travel: My 2014 Income

04 | 27 Annual Expense & Income Reviews

Every year, I publish my annual cost of full-time travel as well as my income. Here’s my 2014 income, where it came from, and what’s on tap for 2015.

Read the full article →

A Week-In-The-Life of Rikka on the Ring Road in Iceland

04 | 20 Week-In-The-Life Series

Here’s a week-in-the-life of Rikka of Deviating the Norm, traveling the ring road in Iceland with some fellow travelers.

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Financial Travel Tip # 125: Things Tourists Overpay For

04 | 17 Financial Travel Tips

Here are a few typical things tourists overpay for, and how to avoid becoming the next casualty. Also: how you can design your own lifestyle business.

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Financially Sustainable Travel: My Cost of Full-Time Travel in 2014

04 | 13 Annual Expense & Income Reviews

What does it cost to travel full-time? That answer varies, as it has for me over the years. Here’s my cost of full-time travel in 2014.

Read the full article →

A Week-In-The-Life of Dan and Jess, Teaching in Rural China

04 | 06 China

Living in rural China has it’s perks and challenges. Here’s a week-in-the-life of Dan and Jess, living and Teaching English in rural China.

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