Trekking in the Andes (Part 3): Machu Picchu

My five-day trip through the Andes culminated in Machu Picchu: a place lives up to, and even exceeds all the hype, and challenged me on many levels.

Trekking in the Andes (Part 3): Machu Picchu Trekking in the Andes (Part 3): Machu Picchu

Trekking the Andes (Pt 2): Huchuy Qosqo, and our Quechua “Mama”

On day two of our trek in the Peruvian Andes, we perform a Peruvian ceremony, visit the ancient Huchuy Qosqo, and meet our Quechua "Mama" who adopts us.

Trekking the Andes (Pt 2): Huchuy Qosqo, and our Quechua “Mama” Trekking the Andes (Pt 2): Huchuy Qosqo, and our Quechua “Mama”

Trekking the Andes: Birthing Llamas, Abandoned Villages, and Rain

Miguel wandered into my life as magically as Peru did. Little did I know that a week later, we'd be on the journey of (my) lifetime, trekking in the Andes.

Trekking the Andes: Birthing Llamas, Abandoned Villages, and Rain Trekking the Andes: Birthing Llamas, Abandoned Villages, and Rain

Receiving the Rites of Munay-Ki in Peru

by Nora Dunn on April 24, 2014

Here in Peru I’ve had a chance to tap into a few Peruvian ceremonies, such as that of the despacho. More recently I completed a Munay-Ki workshop – a transformation; an initiation and receiving of rites that has the potential to change my life, and the lives of many others.

 

What is Munay-Ki?

Coming from high in the Andes and originating with the Shamans of the Q’ero nation (descendents of the Inka), Munay-Ki is a derivative of the Quechua term meaning “I love you”. It is a series of nine rites that are transmitted from person to person, tapping into a lineage of wisdom keepers, seen and unseen.

They are given as the next step in the evolution of humanity, intended to shift and elevate human consciousness and to help us adjust to and integrate the universal changes that have been upon us since 2012 – not coincidentally the end of the Mayan calendar, as well as the beginning of a period of great unrest and transformation for many of us. (Remember when I wrote about 2013 being the worst year ever for me)? Yeah, that’s not a coincidence.)

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NomadisBeautiful-bio-photoIvana and Gianni of Nomad is Beautiful are a digital nomad couple who broke their old habits to live a new, healthy lifestyle on the road. On their journey, through our stories and photographs, they show you places where you can replenish your spirit, take good care of your body, eat and drink healthy local food and beverages, and live mindfully while being on the road. Please enjoy this week-in-the-life of Ivana and Gianni, in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

 

Day 1 – Monday

7:00 AM – Gianni wakes up and practices his regular meditation in a patio of our guesthouse.

8:25 AM – We arrive at the Puttisopon School in Chiang Mai. Here we start our long-term project, in which we meet with children in each country we visit and take pictures of them while they are having their regular classes at school.

Day 1-8.25am

8:30 AM – On the main backyard we meet with Aom, the English teacher and her 42 kids, all nine or ten years old. For the first 15 minutes we stay with them and the other 800 pupils, listening to a daily speech of their head teacher. Kids are sitting on the ground, seeming a bit bored and tired since they have to sit under the hot Thai sun. For us it’s an exciting event. We wait until the national anthem, and we all stand up and sing it.

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Integration (or Not) in Pisac

by Nora Dunn on April 17, 2014

 

I’m living in a retreat centre in Peru founded by a New Yorker (turned Peruvian shaman) and frequented by people (mostly “gringos”) from around the world. Pisac is also an area with many expats and tourists; so many that English is heard at least as much as Spanish is, and there’s even a little area of Pisac called “gringo-ville”, where there is such a tight congestion of gringos living there, that locals and gringos alike simply choose to call a spade a spade.

 

This massive influx of foreigners to the area creates a rift between foreigners and locals. I’m used to living around the world in towns as small as Pisac; small enough that everybody says hello to one another when they pass in the streets.

This doesn’t happen here.

Most locals have blinders on to the many tourists and foreign expats; they don’t even see you when you pass in the streets.

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Trekking in the Andes (Part 3): Machu Picchu

04 | 14 Featured

My five-day trip through the Andes culminated in Machu Picchu: a place lives up to, and even exceeds all the hype, and challenged me on many levels.

Read the full article →

Trekking the Andes (Pt 2): Huchuy Qosqo, and our Quechua “Mama”

04 | 10 Featured

On day two of our trek in the Peruvian Andes, we perform a Peruvian ceremony, visit the ancient Huchuy Qosqo, and meet our Quechua “Mama” who adopts us.

Read the full article →

A Week-In-The-Life of Chris: Postcards from Lapland

04 | 07 Norway

Instead of Chris writing a week-in-the-life of his adventures in Lapland, he has selected 7 days within a year of Lapland, featuring postcards from each.

Read the full article →

Financial Travel Tip #112: 50% off Airfare With Mystery Shopping

04 | 05 Financial Travel Tips

I recently flew from Toronto to Peru for a 50% discount, by mystery shopping. Here’s my experience, and tips for how you can get involved.

Read the full article →

Trekking the Andes: Birthing Llamas, Abandoned Villages, and Rain

04 | 03 Featured

Miguel wandered into my life as magically as Peru did. Little did I know that a week later, we’d be on the journey of (my) lifetime, trekking in the Andes.

Read the full article →

A Digital Detox in the Peruvian Andes

03 | 31 Life as a full-time traveler

I just did a 5-day digital detox in the Peruvian Andes. Although there was no better setting for it, it wasn’t the easiest thing I’ve ever done.

Read the full article →